Tuesday, December 24, 2013

Pay the Talent!

Don't expect free work on your comic book idea.



We have to recognize that there are more writers looking for artists, than artists looking for writers.

Before I go further, let's take a pause and look at  these links below from various writer's points of view.

"Let's pause here for a quick Reality Check. There is no such thing as an idea so fabulous that, based on it alone, anyone could reasonably predict a smash hit. Not even Peanuts was that incredible an idea, in and of itself. The genius of Charles M. Schulz in executing that idea probably had a little something to do with its success."

- Mark Evanier



"Quality artists charge for their work. This insures that they only deal with writers who are “serious”. If you're serious as a writer, you should be willing to pay your artist collaborators, even those you share the IP with, especially your first few times out. (you may be able to find speculative collaborators later). Word to the wise? Try to find an artist who does finished art – pencils, inks and colors together – so that you keep your costs down and learn to work with one collaborator before you try to shepherd a team. What can you expect to pay if you're a writer? Minimum wage for a pencilist, for example, figures out to about $60 a page. If you're looking for an artist to work for hire, that's your starting point. Artists may be willing to adjust that rate dependent upon the percentage of the intellectual property the writer is willing to share with them."
- Mike Luoma


Harlan Ellison -- Pay the Writer





Here's a piece written by James Rainey of the LA Times and a writer's view of freelance getting a little too free in his industry.

"Other publishers pitch the grand opportunities they provide to "extend your personal brand" or to "showcase your work, influence others." That means working for nothing, just like the sailing magazine that offers its next editor-writer not a single doubloon but, instead, the opportunity to "participate in regattas all over the country."
What's sailing away, a decade into the 21st century, is the common conception that writing is a profession -- or at least a skilled craft that should come not only with psychic rewards but with something resembling a living wage."

- James Rainey




to be continued…

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