How-to Create Graphic Novels, Comic Books and Comic Strips

Monday, April 30, 2012

A Pause for the Cause

Man sitting alone at bus stop
One of  a series of illustrations done for a Kelly Thomas video

How to Become a Comic Strip, Comic Book and Graphic Novel Artist


Okay I've discussed the terminology, tools and preparing your portfolio, as well as how to submit your art.

If you're just joining now, then it would be good to go to the beginning and read this is order.

Next we're going to look at the visual vocabulary of comics.

That includes:

Panels
Balloons
Captions
Sound Effects
Actions
Expressions
Feelings and emotions
Symbols
Glyphs

Next…Panels and gutters.

Keep reading and  +1 me. Share with your friends. Please comment. Just create!

copyright 2012 H. Simpson

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Saturday, April 28, 2012

Blambot.com Blog: STUPIDHEAD preview 2!

Blambot.com Blog: STUPIDHEAD preview 2!: http://www.blambot.com/font_stupidhead.shtml


Check out this sound effect font with a classic look!


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copyright 2012 H. Simpson
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Friday, April 27, 2012

The Conventions

Alternative T-Shirt designs for  Popeye - aged and normal

How to Become a Comic Strip, Comic Book and Graphic Novel Artist


Before I move on keep this in mind.

For comic strips, you are submitting and showing your work to the people that can hire you via postal mail or email. So keep it clean and simple.

In the comic book industry only the editor (sometimes art director) can hire you. You can submit your work by postal mail, email or show you portfolio at conventions. Showing your work to writers and artists at conventions can only get you a critique and maybe a recommendation.  Don't expect them to hire you.

Don't press the creative person for a referral or recommendation. You place them in an awkward position. They may like your work, but they don't know you. Your work ethic may not be good, you might have a bad personality, you can't meet deadlines and so on and so forth. Very few people will risk their reputation on someone they don't know.

Don't get lulled into getting a big head that you're great because your family and friends ooh and ahh over your art.

It is a good idea to show your art to other artists as they can give you feedback to improve your work. Show it to as many artists as will take the time to see you. Be respectful of their time. If you keep getting the same critique over and over then it's not their opinion, it's something you need to work on to get better.

Here's a calendar listing of conventions. Always go to the convention web site to verify dates, location and who is attending.





to be continued…

Keep reading and +1 this blog. Share with your friends. Please comment.

Remember… Just Create!

Copyright 2016 H. Simpson

If you are interested in further expanding your knowledge, then I recommend these books.

When you purchase a book by clicking the link below, I get a piece of the action and helps me to continue doing this blog. Support an artist today.
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Thursday, April 26, 2012

Switching Lanes - Words to Pictures

thumbnail art
Thumbnail art for a comic book page

How to Become a Comic Strip, Comic Book and Graphic Novel Artist

Going from Script to Artboard


It all starts with an idea. Then it becomes words or words with pictures. What do you do with words you get from someone else? How do you interpret the script so you can visualize it?

Here's a process you can use.

1. Read the script a few times. Sometimes the images will come to you right away. That's great! Other times you will have to think about what you want to draw. In either case you have to get a clear image of what is happening in your mind. Your mind is your most important drawing tool.  if you can't see it in your mind, the you can't draw it well on paper. If the characters are new to you then you have to imagine what they will look like.

2. Use a highlight marker to choose what items you are going to need reference to draw like the Statue of Liberty, a car wreck, luxury apartment, cars, chairs, kitchen, birds, etc.

3. Make thumbnails to break down the script into pages for pacing,panel breakdowns and composition purposes. You can do this right on the script or on other paper. At this stage you just want to be sure your thinking is clear and you are concentrating on storytelling. You're not really trying to draw here. Do this quickly to get your ideas on paper. it can be stick figures or scribbles. It's for your benefit only.

4. Now collect all the reference images you will need. You don't want to disturb your drawing time by looking for reference then. Get it all at the beginning. Use the reference file you have and the internet. This is also the time to take your own photos. TAke a day to go to locations you may need like downtown, the subway, zoo etc. Also take shots of yourself and people in difficult pose you may need. References are to be used as a guide, not a crutch. It will be plainly obvious if you trace a  reference in one panel and don't have reference for the same thing in another panel.

5. Do layouts. Now is when you want to be concerned about drawing. You have two options. Draw it on an 8.5" x 11" bond paper , enlarge it to your art board size  an then lightbox it onto the board. Or do your layouts directly onto your art board lightly with graphite or non-photo blue pencil. Leave room for balloons and captions.

6. Do some model sheets for yourself of the major characters, so you can draw them consistently from panel to panel.

7. If you have a full script, then now is the time to do the lettering. Do not do lettering for samples you are doing in your portfolio.


This is a quick overview. I will go into detail about this process later.

Here's a fun illustration by the great Brian Buniak.





I also would like to see your comments. Is this helpful to you? Are the explanations clear and complete?

Keep reading and  +1 me. Share with your friends. Please comment. Just create!

copyright 2012 H. Simpson

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Wednesday, April 25, 2012

Check out this very cool creation of Rene Rawls.




I always appreciate when someone goes and creates their own thing rather waiting for somebody to ask them to create.

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copyright 2012 H. Simpson
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4 - Using Reference and Tracing Images in ArtRage Studio


Demo using HP TouchSmart screen with reference and tracing images in ArtRage Studio Pro. A drawing and painting application using the HP TouchSmart computer. Using a regular brush to draw and paint to create digital art with the natural look of drawing and painting.

Please use the hidden dock (I don't know why Blogger hides it, thus forcing me to beg. Sheeesh!) on the right to follow and subscribe to me. I also would like to see your comments. Is this helpful to you? Are the explanations clear and complete?

Keep reading and  +1 me. Share with your friends. Please comment. Just create!

copyright 2012 H. Simpson
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Tuesday, April 24, 2012

How to Submit to Get Your Comic Strip Syndicated


How to Become a Comic Strip, Comic Book and Graphic Novel Artist

Comic Strip Submissions


For comic strips you have to submit directly to the companies by mail mostly. Some do accept email submissions. Never submit original art by mail. Don't be fancy just staple your photocopies together and put it in an envelope with your cover letter. Insert some cardboard to protect it. Always send an SASE (self addresses stamped envelope) with it.

In the comic strip industry there are syndicates that distribute the strips to newspapers. The syndicate purchases rights to your strips, reselling them to newspapers and magazines. Usually it's a 50/50 split on income received from newspapers to carry the strips. Don't expect to be getting a salary.

Strips are usually created 4 weeks in advance for dailies and Sundays 8 weeks in advance. Don't try to become a comic strip artist unless you know you can come up with ideas for everyday on this schedule.

Sunday comic strip panel layouts

Create something from your heart, not something where you are trying to ride a fad. Do what you care about and the audience will gravitate to it. Decide whether your strip is going to be a gag strip or soap opera. Be sure to put your copyright notice on all of your work.

Syndicates each have their own submission policies, however generally you must have 4 to 6 weeks of daily strips and 2 full color Sunday strips. Make sure it is a good introduction of you characters. Draw more strips than you submit so you have developed the characters and know them inside and out yourself.

Most strips are drawn at twice the printed size. You can draw at a ratio that's comfortable for you.

You can also independently submit your strips to editors at individual newspapers or publish as a web-comic.

After you submit to a syndicate all you can do is wait.

And wait.

And wait.

Wait.

Still waiting.

Tired of waiting.

Whoa! Hold on there partner. Don't do anything! There's nothing you can do but wait, so gird your loins! Syndicates receive thousand of submissions a year and only choose 3 or 5 to distribute and put their marketing money behind it. If they don't feel they can get a return on their investment even after it is picked up, then your strip will be dropped. Stay with it! What may be rejected one year can be accepted next year. Keep developing it.

Editor and Publisher magazine has a Syndicate Directory that you can find in the library and online.  You can also buy it from the magazine.

In the comic book industry you have The Big Two - DC Comics and Marvel. In the comic strip industry you have The Big Three  - King Features, United and Universal.

Here are some major syndicates to contact. Follow their submission guidelines exactly!

Creators Syndicate
5777 W. Century Boulevard, Suite 700
Los Angeles, CA 90045

King Features Syndicate
235 East 45th Street
New York, NY 10017

Tribune Media Services
35 N. Michigan Avenue, Suite 1400
Chicago, IL 60611

United Media
200 Madison Avenue
New York, NY 10016

Universal Press Syndicate
4520 Main Street
Kansas City, MO. 64111

Washington Post Writers Group
1150 NW 15th Street
Washington, DC 20071-9200





to be continued…

Keep reading and +1 this blog. Share with your friends. Please comment.

Remember… Just Create!

Copyright 2016 H. Simpson

If you are interested in further expanding your knowledge, then I recommend these books.

When you purchase a book by clicking the link below, I get a piece of the action and helps me to continue doing this blog. Support an artist today.
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Monday, April 23, 2012

The Secret to Putting Together a Winning Portfolio

Walking portfolio

How to Become a Comic Strip, Comic Book and Graphic Novel Artist

Comic Books

Okay, you have you tools and the terminology down; now let's take a look at your goal. It's good to know where you are heading during this journey. Your goal is a portfolio that is going to get you work at the company of your choice. Of course if you want to self-publish, then this obviously isn't for you.

Your entire physical and online sequential art portfolio should be no more than 12 to 15 pages. Any more and you're just boring the person. The physical portfolio should be the original 11" x17" art.

Target your portfolio to the publisher you are submitting to; which means don't show Marvel characters to DC Comics and vice versa.

Present a complete scene within 3 or 4 pages. Each scene should showcase a different mood - action, normal, romantic, quiet, horror, humor, whatever will showcase your range whether with superheroes or not. Each scene should have a beginning, middle and end to the story being told in that scene.

Show that you can draw normal people as well as muscular. People in costumes, uniforms and regular clothing. Different backgrounds and realistic city or fantasy city. Show variety in your characters; different type of people; ethnic and physical builds.

No pin-ups or covers are needed right now. If they like your sequential pages you'll get your chance soon enough after being hired.

Important: The portfolio should include only samples you've done in the past six months. Anything beyond six months tends to make your art look weak and inconsistent, since you should have improved in that time.

Inkers should also include the photocopies of pencils with their inks in their portfolio.

Never mail original art pages to companies. Only mail full size photocopies of your art with your contact information on each page.
Important: At conventions or an office visit always have a leave behind. The leave behind are letter size photocopies of your portfolio suitable for filing by the editor to remind them of you. Put your contact information on every page. So when they go looking through their files for someone, they know how to reach you.

There is no requirement to draw in someone else's style when submitting your portfolio.

If you don't have your own style, then there' s nothing wrong with doing someone else's style, but the risk is it may only hurt you. Use the style, but don't copy them line for line.

Many people have started using someone else's style. Steranko and Barry-Windsor-Smith used Kirby's. Bill Sienkiewicz used Neal Adams. Travis Charest used Jim Lee. Bryan Hitch used Alan Davis.

So it's okay to start out with someone's style, but it's important not to stay there. It should just be a jumping off point for your growth into your own style, as each of the aforementioned artist's have done.

Others have stayed stuck and are always compared the person they copy. They may get some initial buzz, but it doesn't last long. People who have stayed in that phase too long are tagged as clones in the industry.

Can't afford George Perez or Jim Lee? Send in the clones!

So if you already draw a certain way, don't waste the time trying to copy someone's style.

Comic book companies which have a stable of non-creator owned characters could care less about seeing your original characters (if they are not published). The companies want to see what you can do for them with the characters they own.

You don't need to find any scripts. Just take 3 or 4 consecutive pages from the printed comic you're interested in drawing and redraw the pages. Tell the story in your own way. Don't copy anything that was already done.

Best way to do portfolio comic pages for established characters is to take the character you are interested in and choose 3 or 4 pages from their printed comic that you think you can tell the story better and redraw it. This forces you to really think about storytelling as you look at the choices that were made and what you will do differently.

That should be 3 or 4 pages in a row that are a complete scene with a beginning, middle and end to the story being told in that scene.

You don't need official scripts to submit portfolio samples. There are no ideal scripts.  You can find scripts on-line if you don't want to use a printed comic.

Keep in mind these are samples and the editor is not not going to read the script side by side with your art. You are not being judged on how you translate the script, but on the pages you put in front of the editor.

You don't have to follow the script verbatim. Your responsibility is to tell a good story with drawings.

Also if you are drawing the script of an amateur writer then you may doomed to to repeat their mistakes visually.

Even pro writers make mistakes. Sometimes they ask for the impossible like, "Draw the character standing with their back to reader, smiling ironically."

It's okay to go off script.

What are editors looking at?
Solid drawing skills
Draftsmanship
Consistent faces from panel to panel
Form
Light and shadow
Composition
Perspective 
Anatomy
Clothing and drapery
Animals
Acting
How you tell a story visually and with panel to panel continuity.
Pacing
Create a convincing reality (backgrounds and environment are characters also)
Allow space for word balloons (usually the upper third of panel)

If you are submitting online to a company, then follow their guidelines EXACTLY.

When you submit in person, don't say a word. Don't talk unless you are asked a question. Any question you answer should not be an excuse. If you have to make an excuse for anything in your portfolio then that art should not be in your portfolio!

Don't get defensive and feel the need to explain yourself or say you are better than who they have working now. Keep your mouth shut! Accept any and all critiques graciously and thank the editor when you leave.

*Tip: Put your second best drawn scene first. Put your best drawn scene last, because the portfolio is usually left open on those pages while the person responds. You leave a stronger impression in their minds.



to be continued…

Keep reading and +1 this blog. Share with your friends. Please comment.

Remember… Just Create!

Copyright 2016 H. Simpson

If you are interested in further expanding your knowledge, then I recommend these books.

When you purchase a book by clicking the link below, I get a piece of the action and helps me to continue doing this blog. Support an artist today.
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Saturday, April 21, 2012

Superhero of the Month: Thomas Fummo's 1930's Batman & Robin

I came across this and I thought this is a fun, cool idea.


Superhero of the Month: Thomas Fummo's 1930's Batman & Robin: While we usually receive redesigns of characters that look like they could step into comics right now, we occasionally pick up reinterpretat...


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copyright 2012 H. Simpson
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Friday, April 20, 2012

Light My Fire

desk lamp

How to Become a Comic Strip, Comic Book and Graphic Novel Artist

A Word About Comfort


You're going to be spending a lot of time at a drawing table and/or in front of a computer screen drawing your comic strip, comic book or graphic novel. So create a comfortable working environment for your self that will reduce eye strain, muscle strain and fatigue, as well as poor posture. You want to stay healthy.

Lighting

Fluorescent lights are BAD for your eyes. They produce a harsh glare that strains the eyes. They also flicker over a hundred times per second. This creates eyestrain and can cause headaches or migraines.

Incandescent lights are GOOD for your eyes. The heated tungsten filament glows with subdued light similar to the afternoon sunlight.

A full-spectrum bulb is the BEST for eyes. It produces light similar to natural sunlight. This bulb provides a full spectrum of color and many people find they are able to see more noticeable differences in colors and shades. Colorists take note!

Have window light coming from the the side opposite your drawing hand so there are no shadows when you draw.

Seating

Invest in a good chair. This is another area you don't want to cheap out on yourself. Buy a chair with good lumbar support.

It is ideal to change your position every now and then. Adjust your chair and backrest at regular intervals. Stretch your fingers, hands, arms and torso often. Stand up, stretch your back muscles and walk around for a few minutes now and again.

Rather than chair with a back, you might want to consider a Ergonomic Kneeling Posture Chair.


(I don't know why Blogger hides the dock, thus forcing me to beg. Sheeesh!) Please use the hidden dock on the right to follow and subscribe to me. I also would like to see your comments. Is this helpful to you? Are the explanations clear and complete?

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copyright 2012 H. Simpson








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Thursday, April 19, 2012

Free Comic Book / Graphic Novel template pages - Illustrator and more



Free Comic Strip, Comic Book and Graphic Novel Artist

DIGITAL TOOLS OF THE TRADE
Software

DRAWING AND LAYOUT APPLICATIONS

Here are some print size templates you can download and use for American standard size comics and graphic novels.

Download templates for Adobe Illustrator.
You can draw, color and letter with this template.
single page
double page
cover

This template includes my adaptation of the Perspective Path Tool created by great artist and all-around nice guy Freddie Williams II. I've used it with his kind permission. Check out his web-site at http://www.freddieart.com/

The perspective tool is for those who don't have the latest version of Illustrator.

*Note: Template layers are locked, nonprinting layers that you can use to manually trace images.

Download templates for Adobe InDesign.
Import your final art, then you can letter it here.
single page
double page

Download templates for Clip Studio Studio.
You can draw, color and letter with this template.
single page
double page

This is my first set of freebies. Right now they are available to everyone. In the future, I may have some only available to my subscribers, so become a subscribers today so you don't miss out..

Keep reading and  +1 me. Share with your friends. Please comment. Just create!

Here is some recommended reading to get you started on creating your comic masterpiece. I get a little piece of the action if you buy from clicking on the links below and helps me to keep doing this and provide more freebies.

Digital Prepress For Comic Books: Revised, Expanded & Updated

Making Comics: Storytelling Secrets of Comics, Manga and Graphic Novels

DC Comics Guide to Writing Comics

Words for Pictures: The Art and Business of Writing Comics and Graphic Novels

The Art Of Comic-Book Inking 2nd Edition

DC Comics Guide to Coloring and Lettering Comics
copyright 2015 H. Simpson

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Wednesday, April 18, 2012

Why Worry About Trim?


How to Become a Comic Strip, Comic Book and Graphic Novel Artist

Comic page sizes

The size of original comic book art used to be 200% larger than the printed size. This was done because it was easier for the artist to draw details and covered some mistakes when reduced.

The economy caused companies to try to save on paper and ink costs so comics are smaller than they were and the original art paper size has shrunk.

Now the original art is 150% larger than the printed size. The current paper size is 11" x 17" and the drawing area is 10" x 15". This is what you commonly are told.  If you work for a large company that gives you the paper to draw on, then you don't need to know any more than that.

It's a little more complicated than that. If you buy your own paper, you need to know a little more.

Bleed refers to art you want to go to the edge of the page - the trim size. However, if you want art to print to the edge, then your original art has to be drawn beyond the trim size to the bleed area. There also has to be a safe area to include lettering to be sure it doesn't get trimmed.

NOTE: If you self-publish you will make more money by creating comics with no bleed. You get charged for all that excess paper that gets trimmed away!

So these are the sizes you need to make. 

Live/Safe area is 9" x 13.5"
Bleed area is 10.5" x 15.75"
Trim size is 10" x 15"

These are the standard original art paper sizes. However, you can draw at any size that is proportional to the printed size. The ratio is 2:3. So if you have a small scanner you can make things easy for yourself. You don't have to draw on 11" x 17" paper and scan each half of the paper and put it back together on the computer. You can draw at a 2:3 ratio that fits your scanner.

The printed size of the current American comic is 6 3/4" x 10 1/4" (6.625" x 10.25"). 

With the current digital tools available and better printing technology you no longer have to do things the same way.

All caps were used as the standard for comic lettering because the ink would spread and close up in the small spaces between letters "a" and "e" for example. Using all caps presented new issues. A word like FLICK could not be used because the ink would spread and the word would become something else. Shield your eyes children! 

The point is that the early creators of comics wanted to use upper and lower case letters. They were forced to use all upper case by the poor quality of the paper and printing technology. So now with better paper, digital and printer technologies the creative choices are open once again. We can use upper and lower case letters which are easier to read. We don't have to keep using all caps because "that's the way it's always been done."

Likewise with drawing digitally. There's no need to draw at 11" x 17" on the computer and reduce it down. You can draw at the printed size and zoom in to 150% and you're drawing as if it is 11" by 17". There's no need to letter or color at the 11" x 17" size. You will keep your file size small and be able to see what it looks at printed size. You may also save time as you won't have to wait for your computer to render, redraw or catch up with you since your file size will be smaller. 

With original art you don't want to miniaturize. Which means drawing the same detail on a car that's far away as a car that is larger and closer to the reader. This helps to create atmospheric perspective and gives the illusion of depth. You still don't want to do this digitally, however the better quality of e-book readers and zoom in technology do open up some creative possibilities that didn't exist before. Think about it.

So here are the sizes you need to be aware of when creating a comic digitally at print size.

Live/Safe area is 6" x 9"
Bleed area is 7" x 10.5"
Trim size is 6.625" x 10.25"

*Note: Printers only need an 1/8" bleed. Any more is just a waste of your time and space.

A general guide for comic book lettering font sizes to use:

For print comics:
Light text (meaning not a lot of words)
size/leading = 7.35/7.75

Heavy Text (meaning you need to squeeze a lot of words on the page because it's probably over written)
size/leading = 6.35/6.75

For web comics:
Light Text
size/leading = 10/12

Heavy Text
size/leading = 9/11

A good guide is to use no more that 25 to 28 words per balloon or caption.

Next…  I'll have some templates for you to download or maybe I'll only make it available to people who I see follow me.

Subscribe to me. I also would like to see your comments. Is this helpful to you? Are the explanations clear and complete?

Keep reading and  +1 me. Share with your friends. Please comment. Just create!

copyright 2012 H. Simpson
If you are interested in further expanding your knowledge, then I recommend these books.
When you purchase a book by clicking the link below, I get a piece of the action and helps me to continue doing this blog. Support an artist today.



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Tuesday, April 17, 2012

3 - ArtRage Studio Pro Cartoon Demo


Drawing a female cartoon face using Art Rage Studio Pro with the HP TouchSmart computer
 Using a regular brush to draw and paint to create digital art with the natural look of drawing and painting.

Please use the hidden dock (I don't know why Blogger hides it, thus forcing me to beg. Sheeesh!) on the right to follow and subscribe to me. I also would like to see your comments. Is this helpful to you? Are the explanations clear and complete?

Keep reading and  +1 me. Share with your friends. Please comment. Just create!

copyright 2012 H. Simpson



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Monday, April 16, 2012

Using 3 Point Perspective - Adobe Illustrator Tutorial


Tutorial showing how to draw a 3 point perspective grid using Adobe Illustrator software. 



to be continued…

Keep reading and +1 this blog. Share with your friends. Please comment.

Remember… Just Create!

Copyright 2016 H. Simpson

If you are interested in further expanding your knowledge, then I recommend these books.

When you purchase a book by clicking the link below, I get a piece of the action and helps me to continue doing this blog. Support an artist today.
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Sunday, April 15, 2012

2 - Three New Tools in ArtRage



The Waterbrush, Gloop and Ink Pen tools demo for ArtRage Studio Pro. Introduction to ArtRage Studio Pro 3 new tools. A drawing and painting application using the HP TouchSmart computer. Using a regular brush to draw and paint to create digital art with the natural look of drawing and painting



Please use the hidden dock (I don't know why Blogger hides it, thus forcing me to beg. Sheeesh!) on the right to follow and subscribe to me. I also would like to see your comments. Is this helpful to you? Are the explanations clear and complete?

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copyright 2012 H. Simpson



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Saturday, April 14, 2012

1 - Introduction to Art Rage Studio Pro


Introduction to ArtRage Studio Pro. 

A drawing and painting application using the HP TouchSmart computer. I'm using a regular brush to draw and paint on the screen to create digital art with the natural look of drawing and painting.

Please use the hidden dock (I don't know why Blogger hides it, thus forcing me to beg. Sheeesh!) on the right to follow and subscribe to me. I also would like to see your comments. Is this helpful to you? Are the explanations clear and complete?

Keep reading and  +1 me. Share with your friends. Please comment. Just create!

copyright 2012 H. Simpson

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Friday, April 13, 2012

Wow, What a Spread!

Culver City Public Theatre poster
2012 Culver City Public Theatre poster

How to Become a Comic Strip, Comic Book and Graphic Novel Artist


DIGITAL TOOLS OF THE TRADE
Software

LAYOUT APPLICATIONS



A layout application is not for drawing. It is strictly for arranging graphic material on a page. You use it to design a page, spread or book, including choosing type size, typeface and the arrangement of titles and page numbers. It can be used for producing comic books and graphic novels for print and e-books. Design once and use for two different media.

Adobe InDesign

  • The industry leader. Create page layouts for print or digital distribution on tablets, smartphones, and computers.
  • Available for Mac OS X and Windows XP/Vista/7.
  • Download at http://www.adobe.com/


QuarkXPress

  • Page layout application.
  • Available for Mac OS X and Windows XP/Vista/7.
  • Download at www.quark.com/


Manga Studio

  • Hybrid application for drawing and layout.


Manga Studio Debut 4 is your all-in-one solution for ready-to-publish comics using color, screen tones and built-in word balloons. It has no vector feature. Download for $49.99. 

Manga Studio EX 4.0 delivers more drawing and coloring tools such Vector Layers, Gradation tools, Brush open tool, Path Tool, Perspective Rulers and more.

Available for Mac OS X and Windows XP/Vista/7.
Download at http://manga.smithmicro.com/

That completes my comprehensive list of tools you can use in the natural and digital world to create entertaining comic strips, comic books and graphic novels. I've given you lots of choices and by no means do you have to use them all. I do encourage you to try them all to see what works for you.

If anyone feels I left out a tool, please let me know.

Comics used to solely be just pen and ink drawings. As technology has improved the industry has been able to present other approaches such as watercolor and other paints as well as printing from pencils directly.

Don't be limited by the standard way of doing things. Open your mind. Unleash your imagination and bring something new to the party.


Please use the hidden dock (I don't know why Blogger hides it, thus forcing me to beg. Sheeesh!) on the right to follow and subscribe to me. I also would like to see your comments. Is this helpful to you? Are the explanations clear and complete?

Keep reading and  +1 me. Share with your friends. Please comment. Just create!

copyright 2012 H. Simpson




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Thursday, April 12, 2012

You Da One Tablecloth - How to Adobe Illustrator Tutorial




Tutorial showing how to draw a digital tablecloth pattern using Adobe Illustrator software.

The more creative among you will see applications of this tutorial beyond tablecloths, such as wallpaper, brick walls, etc.

Please use the hidden dock (I don't know why Blogger hides it, thus forcing me to beg. Sheeesh!) on the right to follow and subscribe to me. I also would like to see your comments. Is this helpful to you? Are the explanations clear and complete?

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copyright 2012 H. Simpson

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Rasta Love

My ArtRage painting "A Bad Day'
ArtRage painting

How to Become a Comic Strip, Comic Book and Graphic Novel Artist


DIGITAL TOOLS OF THE TRADE
Software

RASTER-BASED IMAGE APPLICATIONS

Adobe Photoshop

  • The industry leader. It is used for drawing, coloring and painting. Not good to use for lettering.
  • Available for Mac OS X and Windows XP/Vista/7.
  • Download at http://www.adobe.com/


ArtRage

  • This is a powerful and easy to use drawing and painting program. You can currently get ArtRage Studio Pro for $59.90 and ArtRage Studio for $29.90.
  • Available for Mac OS X and Windows XP/Vista/7
  • Download ArtRage


ArtWeaver

  • An alternative to Corel Painter. Artweaver is available in two versions: The Artweaver Free version at no cost and Artweaver Plus version at 29 Euros with more features than the free version.
  • Available for Windows XP/Vista/7.
  • Download at http://www.artweaver.de/


Corel Painter

  • Very popular leading digital art software.
  • Available for Mac OS X and Windows XP/Vista/7.
  • Download at http://www.corel.com/


GIMP (GNU Image Manipulation Program)

  • A powerful open source image editor application 
  • Available for Linux, Mac OS X and Windows XP/Vista/7
  • Download for free at http://www.gimp.org/


GIMP tutorials
http://sixrevisions.com/graphics-design/10-websites-to-help-you-master-gimp/
GIMP video tutorials
http://sixrevisions.com/graphics-design/gimp_video_tutorials/

Paint.NET

SketchBook Designer
  • A hybrid paint and vector application
  • Available for Mac OS X and Windows XP/Vista/7.
  • Download at http://usa.autodesk.com/
SketchBook Pro
  • Offers sketching software capabilities.
  • Available for Mac OS X and Windows XP/Vista/7.
  • Download at http://usa.autodesk.com/
  • SketchBook Express is a free version available on the Mac App Store.


A word about software choices. Photoshop was created to to be used by photographers for retouching photos. It was the creativity of artists that started using it for drawing and painting. So don't feel badly if you can't afford an expensive application. Use the free or low cost tools available. Your creativity can make the tool sing and come to life to fit your needs and style of art. Much like the early creative visionaries did with Photoshop by taking a tool that wasn't intended to create art and bending it to their will.

After all, people have made professional looking movies on iPhones! There's nothing to stop you from creating a professional looking comic strip, comic book or graphic novel with whatever tool you choose right now. Start today! Just create something!

Next… page layout programs.


to be continued....

Please use the hidden dock (I don't know why Blogger hides it, thus forcing me to beg. Sheeesh!) on the right to follow and subscribe to me. I also would like to see your comments. Is this helpful to you? Are the explanations clear and complete?

Keep reading and  +1 me. Share with your friends. Please comment. Just create!

copyright 2012 H. Simpson


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